In the Future, Only Rich People Can Afford to Keep Their Emails Secret

See on Scoop.itData & Informatics

“If you’re seeking a service that’s super secure, all-encompassing, and easy to use, the best choice would probably be to go outside the U.S., where legal measures could make it more difficult to access data. But you’ll have to pay a hefty price for it.”

Stephen Dale‘s insight:

On the back of the Edward Snowden revelations, more of us are becoming aware of the level and degree of Government/State digital surveillance, and whilst we can accept that there are legitimate reasons for this, e.g. to gather intelligence  of terrorist activities, there is the inevitable concern that this data (our data) may be misused, misappropriated or even sold to third parties. And not forgetting the private sector, where emerging social analytical tools are being used by marketing departments to track our digital trail.

This article reinforces the view that there may ultimately be two classes of consumers using the internet; those who can afford to pay a premium to remain protected and private and those who cannot.   A whole new economy of companies who provide anonymous search, super-encrypted email and document sharing, and protected document storage etc. are blossoming.  Are we approaching the point whereby the Internet will become like an airplane with first class and economy seats? I’m beginning to think so.

See on www.newrepublic.com

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All UK Mobile Numbers Accessible From Next Week

All UK Mobile Numbers Become Accessible Next Week

A Directory of Mobile Phone numbers goes live early next week. All numbers including those belonging to children will be open to unsolicited messages or calls.

It is easy to unsubscribe, but it must be done before the beginning of next week to ensure you are ex directory.

To remove your number click on this link.

You will need to have your mobile phone with you as the unsubscribe code will be sent to you via text.

Please suggest it to your friends, family or those with children who have UK mobiles.

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Beacon saga; facebook apologises

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Facebooklogo

Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg posted on the company blog last week apologising for missteps with the roll-out of their much maligned  Beacon advertising system.
"We’ve made a lot of mistakes building this feature, but we’ve made
even more with how we’ve handled them. We simply did a bad job with
this release, and I apologize for it," he wrote.

Zuckerberg goes
on to apologise specifically for "taking too long" to make the system
opt-in rather than opt-out (where the site assumed no answer to the
Beacon prompt was a ‘yes’ and went ahead and shared information). Last
week Facebook made Beacon opt-in site-by-site, and they’ve added a privacy control that allows users to shut off the program completely.

One thing that can be said for sure about Facebook: even though they don’t always get it right the first time,
they listen to their users and iterate continuously until they hit
something people are happy with. When they first released the newsfeed
and mini-feed last year, users were outraged that their information was
being shared without their control to friends. Since then, Facebook has
included increasingly more fine grained privacy controls that allow
users to control what info gets published. The result? The newsfeed is
often credited as one of the most appealing and important features of
the network.

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