Content Curation Primer

The Internet is a wonderful invention. We can find out almost anything we need to know, from cures for rashes to what’s on at the local cinema to the recipe for chocolate cake. We’ve come to expect that whatever we need to know, someone somewhere will have made it available on the Internet. Better still, with the revolution in mobile technology, we have access to this information more or less at any time, any place and on any device. We are truly an information-driven society, where news reaches us within an instant of it happening, anywhere in the world. We know what our friends are doing, where they are, and quite often – what they’ve just had to eat!

We’re also pretty adept at buying stuff online. Need a new TV? A quick search will give us many thousands of options. We can drill down to specific stores, do price comparisons and be swamped with options and technical specifications. No shortage of information there.

It should probably come as no surprise that information volume is now doubling every 11 hours [Source IBM], or that every two days we create as much information as we did from the dawn of civilization up until 2003 [Source: Eric Schmidt], and I’m guessing that most people will have seen the (in)famous infographic showing what happens in an ‘Internet Minute’ – reproduced below.

What happens in an internet minute

An Internet Minute - click to enlarge
An Internet Minute – click to enlarge

 

 

 

 

 

 

[Source: Intel]

So where is all of this leading?

To quote from IBM’s “The Toxic Terabyte”:

Knowledge is power – but only if it can be extracted quickly and effciently from an ever-growing mass of data. Businesses and other organisations now see their information stocks snowballing beyond their ability to manage them and beginning to work against the health of the enterprise by damaging effciency and bottom lines.

The stock answer to the data pile-up is more cheap storage and lots of it. But reflexively pumping everything and anything into an apparently limitless reservoir hurts the organisation in three ways:

  1. It becomes harder and harder to retrieve information promptly

  2. More people are needed to manage increasingly chaotic data dumps

  3. Networks and application performance are slowed by excess traffic as users search and search again for the material they need.

As we struggle to manage the Internet fire-hose, it has probably already occurred to many people that more information is not the same as ‘better’ information; that the volume of information is working on some sort of inverse relationship to ‘relevant’ information, and that having millions of choices and options hinders rather than helps us make the right decisions.

It seems obvious that with this proliferation of data and information we are in increasing need of systems to sort, maintain and re-purpose digital content in a systematic manner. For a while now we’ve been making do with search as a primary means of sifting through the pile. But search is only really good for “fast-food” information; getting you the answers quick and dirty, without much thought for context or quality. If you want quality information, then you need to go via a content curator.

The role of the curator has been valued for centuries, but it has been traditionally associated with the professionals who practice their art in the confines of the world’s museums and galleries. To suggest that digital curators all bring the same depth and breadth of knowledge as a professional curator might be stretching a point. But there are more similarities than differences. Curation is all about creating value from collections – which can be physical things such as art exhibitions or museum artifacts; or digital content, such disc jockey music mixes, website reviews of best TV buys, or a collection of the best educational videos. Curators know that the sum of an experience can be greater than the individual parts. And you don’t always have to be an expert to tell a decent story.

Digital content curation is becoming an increasingly valuable skill. Applying expert knowledge to a broad information domain in order to filter out the noise and identify useful and relevant information, possibly adding knowledgeable insight to the information to create added value, is all part of the role of the accomplished content curator. These emergent skills are increasingly in demand by information consumers (and especially managers and executives) who are drowning in a sea of information and want up-to-date, relevant, decision-ready information, delivered quickly enough for them to make use of it.

The knowledge and skills that underpin the content curation role would – it seems to me – be consistent with those of traditional “Information Professionals”, e.g. Knowledge and Information Managers, Community Managers, Data Analysts, Librarians etc., though they may not recognise this themselves. The problem of information overload can be addressed by good information management practice. For example: use of filters, advanced search techniques, categorisation, tagging, use of taxonomies and ontologies – bread and butter to most information professionals. The added dimension for effective curation is the interpretation of the information, adding meaning and insight to curated content, summarising key points, or providing a narrative or story to connect the pieces.

This, then is the essence of a series of courses on Content Curation that I’m running this year, specifically aimed at and for “Information Professionals”. The first course is scheduled for 20th June and has the following key objectives:

  • Be able to use powerful search techniques and aggregation tools to find and filter relevant information.
  • Know how to use taxonomies, folksonomies and tagging to manage and organise information and develop techniques to identify and validate trusted information sources.
  • Understand how to personalise appropriate content curation tools and services.
  • Publish curated content relevant to your chosen domains of expertise.
  • Be able to deliver decision-ready information to users, customers and stakeholders in order to demonstrate your value to your organisation.

Book now if this something that appeals to your personal development plan, or if it’s something that your organisation could benefit from.

If you’re still not sure what “Content Curation” actually means, check out the brief presentation below.

To conclude with one quote: “It’s not information overload; it’s filter failure” Clay Shirky.

And a recommended read about use of personal filters: Filtering – from Information Deluge to Context with JP Rangaswami

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Fostering Leadership: A Look At Internships And Apprenticeships Offered In The UK

Guest Post by Roslyn Tam

The youth in the UK have been facing an all-too-familiar problem in recent months: a growing struggle to find jobs. The lion’s share of UK firms, especially the large firms that provide many of the hiring placements that the nation needs, are looking for experienced workers who already come in with certain skills. While those creating policy in educational leadership doctoral programs can improve upon the material students are presented with, more will be required of these kids. Students and youth entering the workforce rarely have enough on the job experience to qualify for these positions, leading to intense competition for the few entry-level position available to all.

There is an answer to this youth employment crunch: it’s called internship. However, internships have not been a traditional approach to position preparedness in the UK. While the Parliament is well-known for its current internship programs in a wide number of fields, private firms have been slower to catch. Surprisingly, many international businesses have learned internship techniques from other nations and carried their techniques to Britain as they expand or return with new ideas. One such example is Infosys, a global company that partnered with the National Apprenticeship Scheme in 2012. Ideally, the National Apprenticeship Scheme will continue to partner with major companies and increase the number of apprenticeships and internships.

Benefit Analysis

The students, youth and returning workers who qualify for UK internships may not be so quick to participate, even in the face of unemployment. After all, internships get a bad rap in many ways. They are considered to be stressful work with little reward – low wages, lack of respect and dismal working conditions, among other negative issues that keep some applicants away. UK businesses are attempting to change this stigma by offering greater benefits for internships and similar programs.

One such benefit is increased wages. A 2010 survey found that 63 percent of employers had begun to pay their interns at least national minimum wage, and in fact most of that 63 percent (92 percent of them) paid interns higher than minimum wage voluntarily. Moves like these are slowly convincing youth that they will be respected in internships. Indeed, organizations such as the Trades Union Congress and National Union of Students have been pushing for required minimum wage payment for all UK interns to encourage the trend. The long term benefits remain the same, including a chance to develop useful business connection, gain more experience and earn higher wages more rapidly.

New Trends in Internships

Young people are not the only ones to focus on internships these days. The average age of internship applicants is on the rise in the UK, and a large number of them are 25 years old or older. The trend makes sense. These workers, faced with unemployment themselves, are interested in increasing their own job wage and opening the door to companies they would not be able to enter otherwise. They also tend to have families or debt, leading to a greater focus on paid internship and even more competition, thus creating a sharp divide in UK programs where the paid jobs are in incredibly high demand while unpaid internships are impractical for all but recent graduates or hopeful students. The “work for life” model has been broken, but many firms have been proven slow to realize it.

I’d be interested to know more about your experiences of internship programmes, either as a provider or as an internee. Please comment.

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New Paradigms For Collaboration & Knowledge Sharing

The world of social interaction, fuelled by the plethora of social media tools, has opened up new opportunities to learn and share. Classroom training is no longer an essential part of learning and development. We can now tap into the collective wisdom of peers and experts as and when we need. Skilling ourselves for a challenging and volatile environment is a personal responsibility – we can’t rely on others, including the people and organisations we work for.

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I was recently asked to present at an Institute For Employment Studies event for corporate HR and Heads of Learning & Development. The slides I used are embedded at the end of this bog, and also available at Slideshare and Authorstream.

The title of the event was “Getting maximum business value from your L&D activity”, which, for me, opened up an opportunity to discuss and describe what I see as the unprecedented opportunities and potential available through the Internet and the Social Web for learning and personal development (also referred to as “Personal Knowledge Management”).

The world of social interaction, fuelled by the plethora of social media tools, has opened up new opportunities to learn and share. Classroom training is no longer an essential part of learning and development. We can now tap into the collective wisdom of peers and experts as and when we need. Skilling ourselves for a challenging and volatile environment is a personal responsibility – we can’t rely on others, including the people and organisations we work for.

Sadly, for some, this is not as easy as it sounds. Workplace restrictions on what staff can see and do on the Internet are controlled and regulated by policies – and people – that have changed little since the 20th Century. If you have a HR or L&D manager who has never blogged, does not use LinkedIn and refuses to engage with social media, it’s unlikely they will advocate the use of these facilities in the workplace, and consequently no business case will be made to provide access to social networks or social media tools. Consequently, more and more people find they need to use their smartphones in the workplace (unless these have also been banned) or revert to out-of-hours working to do the things they could and should have done at work.

This leads to some crazy anomalies, which really ought to be challenged more vigorously, such as the many public sector departments who use YouTube to promote their services but ban their own staff from accessing this medium. Or the NHS Trusts that prevent their staff from accessing networks such as Patient Opinion, and consequently don’t know what is being said about their hospital services and therefore unable to challenge or respond to complaints.

But this must surely change. Organisations (particularly public sector) can’t continue to trot out the same excuses as to why they restrict access to the social web. Yes, we know that anything “social” might mean time wasting, but that’s no different to misuse of the telephone, or attending one of those meaningless meetings that happen every Monday morning. Yes, there is a requirement for transparency and the need to comply with Freedom of Information, but these can’t be perennially used as obstacles to tools and networks that support collaboration and knowledge sharing. The day of the “lobotomised PC”, which limits access to company-approved applications and networks, must surely be coming to an end (as is the lobotomised staff who are not permitted to think and act for themselves!)

So, coming back to the main thrust of my presentation – that it is a personal responsibility to attain the necessary education and skills to survive and thrive in an increasingly unpredictable economy. Staff can’t (and shouldn’t) rely on the prescriptive nature of their company’s core training curriculum, which is more likely to be inward-focussed and heavily weighted toward policies, strategy and compliance rather than vocational training – unless of course you are fortunate enough to work for that rare breed of organisation that funds apprenticeship schemes. It is foolish to plan an entire career on the assumption that you’ll be working for the same organisation. Transferable skills should be the primary goal – which may not be the first priority for organisations that want to retain staff!  Specialism is all very well provided it’s not dependent on one specific industry or organisation. See wheeltappers for lessons learnt!

Perhaps the difference between ‘corporate’ learning and self-directed learning is best illustrated in this diagram:

Personalised Learning

 

In order to develop a true learning organisation, staff need to be given much more freedom to use the tools, facilities, applications and networks that they have chosen. After all they are far closer to the issues, problems and potential solutions associated with their work than a CIO, a CFO or head of L&D. It is my firm belief that social learning and personal development requires a shift from hierarchies to networks, and empowerment of the workforce to choose the tools they need to do the job. Organisation that can’t or won’t grasp this paradigm shift will struggle to attract and retain talent, and will struggle to survive against more agile and adaptable businesses that do.

What do you think?

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Engaging the Social Web for Personal Knowledge Management (PKM)

The Social Web for Personal Knowledge Management. A one-day training course that provides a practical and detailed introduction to social media and social/professional networks that will enable delegates to achieve a greater understanding of their context for use and deployment within their organisation and for personal and professional development.

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Personal Knowledge Management

I’ve recently re-vamped the social media/social networks training that I do on behalf of TFPL. The training has always been about using the social web for personal and professional development, (and anyone outside of marketing and comms may argue that this is what it’s really for!) but I wanted to re-emphasise the value for those interested in Personal Knowledge Management (PKM).

Details of the course are on the TFPL website (link above), but replicated here:

Introduction:

There is a desire to develop more effective knowledge sharing and a culture of collaboration in most organisations, but little recognition of what this means in terms of staff development and overcoming barriers to change. The enormous growth of social media tools and social/professional networks over the past few years has created new opportunities and new challenges for people and organisations that want to embrace this dynamic world of social interaction and fluid knowledge flows. However, It is not widely recognised that collaboration and knowledge sharing are skills and practices that rarely get taught. It’s something we may learn on the job in a hit or miss fashion. Some people are natural at it. Others struggle to understand it.

This one-day course provides a practical and detailed introduction to social media and social/professional networks that will enable delegates to have a greater understanding of their context for use and deployment within their organisation and for personal and professional development.

Outcomes:

  • An understanding of social media tools and social networks, and their context for engagement and knowledge sharing
  • An understanding of the three-step process to personal knowledge management: seeking; sense-making; sharing *
  • Developing an approach to more effective management of information ? avoiding information overload.
  • Using free web tools for discovery, research and engagement.
  • Knowing how to overcome the barriers to knowledge sharing and build a trusted network.

Programme:

  • Overview of the social web
  • Creating and maintaining your personal profile
  • Seeking, listening and observing: an introduction to social bookmarking, aggregators and tracking tools.
  • Sense-making: an introduction to blogs & blogging, wikis, Twitter, Yammer, Facebook, Google+
  • Social capital, trust and reputation.
  • Sharing and participating: an introduction to social networks and Communities of Practice for personal and professional development.
  • Creating and personalising your KM routines and digital environment for enhanced learning and professional development
  • Practical exercises and examples of the Social Web in action

Teaching style:

Highly interactive workshop and lecture

Who should attend?

Those who wish to understand and engage with the Social Web as an environment for personal learning, professional development and effective collaboration.

I should add that apart from the scheduled events organised by TFPL (next training event is on 2nd October 2012), I can schedule and run the training to meet specific needs of people and organisations, using the organisation’s in-house facilities or an external training venue. Just let me know your requirements and I’ll provide a quote.

These training courses tend to fill up quite quickly, so get on your computer and book now if you’re interested!

* The “Seeking, Sense-making, Sharing model is based on the work of Harold Jarche.

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Pitfalls and Advantages of Accredited Online LPN Programs

Guest Blog from Jennifer Smith

Licensed practical nurses (LPNs) play some of the most vital roles in our healthcare system today.  They are responsible for a wide range of patient care, including dressing wounds, giving injections, monitoring temperature and heart rate, and gathering patient information. Some LPNs are even responsible for performing laboratory test and assisting in an infant’s delivery. While most LPNs work in hospitals and other major healthcare centers, many are also employed in nursing homes, doctor’s offices, and home care capacities.

According to estimates compiled by the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, there are currently 728,670 people employed in the country as licensed practical nurses. While this number may sound high, the Bureau of Labor predicts a significant demand for LPNs in the medium-term future. This prediction fits well with other estimates that highlight the country’s shortfall of doctors, nurses, and other healthcare practitioners. The United States has a growing yet aging population and an educational system that makes a healthcare career difficult for many people to pursue. The end result is that nursing jobs stand to remain in high demand for some time.

In light of this, many people are going back to school and taking accredited online lpn programs in order to become a licensed practical nurse. While LPN programs are certainly offered at traditional colleges and vocational schools, the online route is particularly appealing for those who have family obligations, financial constraints, and jobs that they don’t want to quit. Their decision is further strengthened by the quality of online nursing degrees; over the past several years, the top providers of an online nursing education have invested in strengthening and diversifying their options. Top school such as Kaplan University, Jacksonville University, South University, and the University of Phoenix now offer degrees that are fully online, that can equip students with a wide range of specialized opportunities and resources, and that are taught by skilled practitioners in the field. LPN courses at these schools routinely fill up quickly as a result.

If you’re considering becoming an LPN, how can you determine whether an online program is right for you? How can you decide whether a traditional or an online course makes more sense for your current needs as well as your career goals?

To answer these questions, let’s take a look at some of the pitfalls and advantages of taking an accredited online LPN program:

Pitfalls of Online LPN Programs:

  • There will be little to no hands-on clinical training
  • Students and instructors don’t have the benefit of face-to-face interactions
  • A lack of classroom collaboration may leave students less prepared for the team environment in which most LPNs work
  • While setting your own study schedule has its advantages, being able to go through the program at your own pace may be problematic for students who are lacking in self-discipline

Advantages of Online LPN Programs:

-The curriculum in an online LPN program is almost identical to that of a traditional program

-Students can set their own pace for assignments and exams, making the course a less stressful experience

-The ability to work from home and on their own time affords students the ability to maintain jobs and family obligations

-Students save money by paying less in tuition and by forgoing the cost of expensive textbooks

-Presentation and lecture materials are usually well-organized, virtually available, and easily accessible

-Online learning can lead to faster rates of comprehension, according to a study from Carnegie Mellon University

-Online universities often have better reputations and excellence standards than the average community college

These are the main pitfalls and advantages to keep in mind when considering an online LPN degree. Ultimately, the decision should be based upon your unique circumstances and goals. If you feel as though you can handle the lack of a physical learning experience, the flexibility, availability, and affordability of an online course are certainly hard to match.

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Social Media: Exploiting Knowledge In Networks

Wordle small Exploting_Knowledge_in_Networks

There are still some places available on the “Exploiting Knowledge in Networks” training event next week, Tuesday 4th October.

The training focuses on use of Social Media tools to support Personal Knowledge Management (PKM) and self development. The following is brief synopsis of the training and what will be covered:

Introduction:

There is a desire to develop more effective knowledge sharing and a culture of collaboration in most organisations, but little recognition of what this means in terms of staff development and overcoming barriers to change. The enormous growth of social media tools and social/professional networks over the past few years has created new opportunities and new challenges for people and organisations who want to embrace this dynamic world of social interaction and fluid knowledge flows. However, It is not widely recognised that collaboration and knowledge sharing are skills and practices that rarely get taught. It’s something we may learn on the job in a hit or miss fashion. Some people are natural at it. Others struggle to understand it. 

This one day course provides a practical and detailed introduction to social media and social/professional networks that will enable delegates to have a greater understanding of their context for use and deployment within their organisation and for personal and professional development.

Outcomes:

  • An understanding of social media tools and social networks, and their context for engagement and knowledge sharing
  • An understanding of on-line privacy, reputational risk, and the dichotomy of personal and professional identities
  • An understanding of the barriers to knowledge sharing and collaboration and how these can be overcome
  • An understanding of the principles for creating a personalised social media toolkit to support on-going learning and collaboration

Programme:

  • Overview of the social web
  • Risks and rewards in the use of social media
  • Creating and maintaining your personal profile
  • Social media tools and their context for knowledge sharing
  • Listening and observing; an introduction to aggregation, sentiment and tracking tools
  • Developing your social network and making connections (includes Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+)
  • Communities of Interest/Practice for personal and professional development
  • Practical exercises and examples of Social Media in action

If you’d like to book a place on this training course, go to the TFPL website and click on the “book” link. If you’d like more information about the course then please contact me (e.g. use the comments facility in this blog).

If you can’t make the 4th October event, the course will be repeated on 6th March 2012 and 2nd October 2012.

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Exploiting Knowledge in Networks (training event)

Wordle: Exploting Knowledge in Networks

I’ll be running the above mentioned training course next week in Edinburgh for delegates from Scottish Government and the (Scottish) Improvement Service. The training has been commissioned through TFPL, and details of the event are on the TFPL training pages.

It is perhaps worth noting that – as far as I am aware – this is one of the few training events that focus on social media and social networks for ‘Personal Knowledge Management‘ as opposed to the many and varied events on social media for communications and marketing.  Yes, we’ll cover the elements of communications and marketing, but from the perspective of personal engagement strategies and managing relationships, rather than from a corporate perspective.

A definition of Personal knowledge management (PKM)

Refers to a collection of processes that an individual carries out to gather, classify, store, search, retrieve, and share knowledge in his/her daily activities and how these processes support work activities. It is a response to the idea that knowledge workers increasingly need to be responsible for their own growth and learning and represents a bottom-up approach to knowledge management, as opposed to more traditional, top-down KM . Source: Wikipedia

To quote myself from the course synopsis:

“…..It is not widely recognised that collaboration and knowledge sharing are skills and practices that rarely get taught. It’s something we may learn on the job in a hit or miss fashion. Some people are natural at it. Others struggle to understand it. This one day course provides a practical and detailed introduction to social media and social/professional networks that will enable delegates to have a greater understanding of their context for use and deployment within their organisation and for personal and professional development”

Specific topics covered in the training include:

  • Overview of the social web
  • Risks and rewards in the use of social media
  • Creating and maintaining your personal profile
  • Social media tools and their context for knowledge sharing
  • Listening and observing; an introduction to aggregation, sentiment and tracking tools
  • Developing your social network and managing relationships (includes Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+)
  • Communities of Interest/Practice for personal and professional development
  • Practical exercises and examples of Social Media in action
  • Building a personalised collaboration toolkit

I have created a general web resource for material used on the training – which is a moving feast, given the rapidly changing environment – and maintain a Diigo social bookmarking group for collecting useful links to social media, social business and social networking resources (feel free to join and contribute !).

The course notes are proprietary, and hence not available from the social media toolkit link, but to give a visual flavour of the content I’ve run the notes through Wordle – which is the image shown at the start of this blog. Click to enlarge.

Please contact me if you are interested in the training or just need more information.

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Social by Social Game

I’ve had a few people asking about the Social Media Game that is mentioned in the “Web 2.0 Tools for Facilitating Knowledge Management” training event that I ran earlier this week. The game was originally developed by Beth Kanter, David Wilcox and Drew Mackie, and has undergone a number of iterations and refinements, resulting in the “Social by Social Game“, which is the version I use for these training events.

The Facilitator’s notes for running the game can be found on the Social by Social website, reproduced below with a few modifications for the way that I run it.

You can play the Social by Social game in two ways – as a simulation around a situation that you invent, or “for real” in relation to a place or an organisation

In each case the sequence is much the same:

Delegates are asked to describe or invent a situation (a problem, or project)  that they are facing. I try to encourage delegates to think about a real work-related situation as opposed to inventing something, otherwise later stages of the game can become a little abstract if there isn’t a real-world context. This then is the scenario.

Delegates are split into groups of not more than eight people, around a theme or set of issues. Then each group:-

  1. Defines what they are trying to achieve:  the goals.
  2. Identifies the people they wish to engage, choosing methods from a set of cards. Cards have budget points as costs – so you have to prioritise.
  3. Think about the communication and engagement methods that are needed to achieve the goals, and choose the social media tools or other activities from another set of cards.
  4. Review the plan that is being developed and think about the resources that will be needed, and the roles to carry it out.
  5. Choose a number of the characters who figure in the scenario, and tell the stories of what happens to them over some months, or longer.
  6. If there is time, the Facilitator can throw in crises and opportunities for the groups to consider – e.g. key resources being pulled from the project, or funding being reduced.

Numbers

You can play with any number from a few people upwards. Ideally you need two groups, so six is a realistic minimum to get useful discussion. If you have large numbers you just split into lots of groups. The effective limit is set by the time it takes for groups to report back – but there are ways around that: see below.

Facilitators

One or two people, respected by participants, should act as facilator(s). They should ensure that participants are briefed; organise the room; manage the flow of the game without being directive; and make sure that any report back and final discussion relates to the purpose of the exercise. They should check that people are clear about the purpose of the workshop, and help them reach useful conclusions.

Equipment

You will need flip chart paper, preferably on easels, marker pens, one set of cards (engagement, tools, resources, roles), blu-tack, post-it notes. If you want a record, you’ll need a camera for photos and maybe video.

Establishing goals

Give groups a planning sheet, and ask each group to write into the top left quadrant their goals – what they are trying to achieve in the situation they are addressing.

  • Identify who you wish to engage
  • Ask groups to think about the different interests they need to engage with, and make a note of those in the top right quadrant.

Using the cards

Offer the groups the cards that they will use to plan their engagement, and then to develop their plan using the different tools and activities. I split the cards into the various categories and issue them in the following order as the group’s plans develop:

  • tools and methods (yellow marking)
  • engagement  activities (green marking)
  • roles and resources

Each card has a “budget” of effort/cost – 1, 2 or 3. Set budgets so groups can’t choose all the cards: say, 10 for engagement, 15 for tools. Ask groups to stick engagement cards top right, tools bottom right … adding their own ideas on blank cards or post-its, and amending cards if necessary. They are really just aids to conversation … so encourage as much discussion as possible, not just a mechanical exercise of playing the numbers.

After groups have chosen engagement and tools cards, ask them to consider what resources they will need, and what roles.

Reporting back

At this point, invite groups to report back. That could be to the room as a whole or just to the group that provided the challenge, if that’s the way things were set up.

By posting the flip chart sheet to a wall, then inviting people to wander round and review. That’s a good way of doing things if you have a lot groups, and limited time.

Variations of the game

  1. A slight variation of the game is that after the scenario and goals have been defined, the “challenge” is swapped with another group, i.e. the other group are now acting as consultants to the first group in delivering a solution that meets their goals, and vice versa. This can lead to some interesting dynamics and forces each group to think about how they present their recommendations to their “customer’ group.
  2. The Facilitator can introduce Resource cards where delegates need to consider how the project will be funded and maintained.

I’ve attached  copies of PDF’s containing all the material for running this game, that is:

I’d be interested in getting feedback from anyone who has facilitated or took part in this game and whether it achieved the objective of thinking first about the problem and then what tools are required, and not (as so often happens) to implement the tools before really understanding what problem they are meant to fix. I’d also be interested to hear about any other variations of the game that people have developed.

Below is a photo I took of the output from the game from the “Web 2.0 Tools for Facilitating Knowledge Management” training event.

SxS game

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Web 2 Tools for Facilitating Knowledge Management

Doing final prep today for the Web 2 tools training course that I’m running on Tuesday 29th March. Key outcomes for the training are:

  • An understanding of social networks and social media and the overlap between personal and professional identities.
  • An understanding of the barriers to knowledge sharing and collaboration and how these can be overcome.
  • Creation of a personalised social computing toolkit to support on-going learning and development in collaborative tools and techniques.

This will be highly practical, hands-on training event, since I firmly believe that you can’t really ‘teach’ social media. The best way to learn is by doing!

The programme includes:

  • Social networks, privacy, digital orientations and the increasing overlap between personal and business networking.
  • Risk and rewards in on-line engagement and collaboration.
  • What does effective collaboration look like and what skills are needed to be an effective collaborator?
  • Micro-blogging (e.g. Twitter) and its role as a business tool.
  • Social Media Game – a fun game which introduces delegates to the various social media tools, how they can be used to solve real business problems, and the pros and cons of the deployment of these tools.
  • The power of social bookmarking for knowledge sharing and collaboration.
  • A practical introduction to Web 2.0 collaboration tools, including Google Apps, Blogs and Wikis.
  • A practical introduction to social networks and social media, including Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, Flickr and Slideshare.
  • Tools and techniques for developing and fostering successful communities of practice.
  • Building a personalised collaboration toolkit.

Venue for the event is:

Etc. Venues

The Hatton

51-53 Hatton Garden

London EC1N 8HN

I’m looking forward to meeting the delegates – a good cross section representing both public and private sectors. It should be a good day!

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Web 2.0 tools for facilitating knowledge management

Having run a number of social media workshops for UK Local Government over the past few months, I will be focusing specifically on how social media and social networking (Web 2.0) can support the development of personal learning – ‘Knowledge Management’ at the forthcoming TFPL training event on 24th March 2010 – open to both public and private sector organisations.

There has been considerable interest in this training so I’m anticipating that there may be a few more courses shceduled in the coming year.

Details of the training below:

introduction:

There is a growing recognition but not yet a consensus about integrating Web 2.0 technologies into an organisation’s workflows and business processes. There is a desire to develop more effective knowledge sharing and a culture of collaboration amongst staff, but little recognition of what this means in terms of organisational change. Successful organisations need to be agile and able to adapt to an increasingly volatile environment. They are more likely to achieve this where conversations can flow and opportunities exist for collaboration and co-creation. In essence, we all need to be collaboration ‘superstars’. The problem is, collaboration is a skill and set of practices that rarely gets taught. It’s something we may learn on the job in a hit or miss fashion. Some people are natural at it. Others struggle to understand it.

This one day course provides a practical and detailed introduction to Web 2.0 tools and techniques that will support more effective collaboration and knowledge sharing, and will give greater confidence to staff that may be on the periphery of the socio-technology changes that are becoming increasingly prevalent in both their professional and private lives.

outcomes:

  • An understanding of social networks and social media and the overlap between personal and professional identities.
  • An understanding of the barriers to knowledge sharing and collaboration and how these can be overcome.
  • Creation of a personalised social computing toolkit to support on-going learning and development in collaborative tools and techniques.

programme:

  • Social networks, privacy, digital orientations and the increasing overlap between personal and business networking.
  • Risk and rewards in on-line engagement and collaboration.
  • What does effective collaboration look like and what skills are needed to be an effective collaborator?
  • Micro-blogging (e.g. Twitter) and its role as a business tool.
  • Social Media Game – a fun game which introduces delegates to the various social media tools, how they can be used to solve real business problems, and the pros and cons of the deployment of these tools.
  • The power of social bookmarking for knowledge sharing and collaboration.
  • A practical introduction to Web 2.0 collaboration tools, including Google Apps, Blogs and Wikis.
  • A practical introduction to social networks and social media, including Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, Flickr and Slideshare.
  • Tools and techniques for developing and fostering successful communities of practice.
  • Building a personalised collaboration toolkit.

Please contact me or TFPL if you are interested in attending a future course, or having a tailored training event for your organisation.

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